School supplies – Woodrose Alumnae http://woodrosealumnae.org/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 15:04:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://woodrosealumnae.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-2021-08-02T214900.103.png School supplies – Woodrose Alumnae http://woodrosealumnae.org/ 32 32 COVID-19 tests available, but supplies limited, in Cambridge area https://woodrosealumnae.org/covid-19-tests-available-but-supplies-limited-in-cambridge-area/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 10:44:14 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/covid-19-tests-available-but-supplies-limited-in-cambridge-area/ The shortage of rapid, home-based, self-administered COVID-19 test kits has made it difficult to find them in Guernsey County, but there are still many options for local residents. “We sell the rapid home tests, but they are difficult to keep in stock,” said Carol Rose, deputy director of Rite Aid pharmacy in Cambridge. “We offer […]]]>

The shortage of rapid, home-based, self-administered COVID-19 test kits has made it difficult to find them in Guernsey County, but there are still many options for local residents.

“We sell the rapid home tests, but they are difficult to keep in stock,” said Carol Rose, deputy director of Rite Aid pharmacy in Cambridge. “We offer drive-thru COVID testing, but it is not a quick test. These tests are sent out and the results are usually available within three to five days.”

Pharmacist Michelle Carmichael, pharmacy manager at Walmart on Southgate Parkway in Cambridge, agreed that it was difficult to keep rapid tests in stock.

“They arrive early in the morning but they are gone quickly, usually before I even get to work,” Carmichael said.


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Philadelphia School District moves 81 virtual schools through Friday due to staff issues related to COVID – CBS Philly https://woodrosealumnae.org/philadelphia-school-district-moves-81-virtual-schools-through-friday-due-to-staff-issues-related-to-covid-cbs-philly/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 17:27:00 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/philadelphia-school-district-moves-81-virtual-schools-through-friday-due-to-staff-issues-related-to-covid-cbs-philly/ PHILADELPHIA (CBS) – The return to distance learning comes as COVID cases in our region soar and schools face staff shortages. The Philadelphia School District announced Monday that 81 schools are expected to go virtual until at least Friday. The school district will then determine how to proceed next week. READ MORE: Lyft driver shoots […]]]>

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) – The return to distance learning comes as COVID cases in our region soar and schools face staff shortages. The Philadelphia School District announced Monday that 81 schools are expected to go virtual until at least Friday.

The school district will then determine how to proceed next week.

READ MORE: Lyft driver shoots 2 men in West Philadelphia carjacking, police say

Eyewitness News was on Tuesday at South Philly High School, which is one of three places families can go if they need technical assistance. The other two locations are at the Fitzpatrick Annex Building and Martin Luther King High School.

The centers are open this week from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., but on Wednesdays they close at 5 p.m.

For now, families and staff are scrambling to understand the temporary change to virtual.

A lot of students had already returned their chrome books after returning to in-person learning and will now need to pick up what they will need for the next few days after the District decision temporarily shut down nearly seven dozen schools due to staff shortages linked to COVID.

Some parents fear that these surprise disruptions will affect the quality of their children’s work.

“I’m really confused about this because I’m a little worried about what they’re learning right now,” said Cecilia Figuereo, who was dropping off her child at Masterman. “For example, my daughter was sent home in December because she was next to another child, but no one was teaching her. “

In a social media post, State Representative Jordan Harris, who represents South Philly, said:

READ MORE: Walmart Temporarily Shuts South Philadelphia Site for Cleanup Amid Rising COVID Cases

“First, the schools in Philly made the right choice in closing buildings this week. Second, it was done in a totally unacceptable way at the last minute with poor communication with teachers, staff, parents and students.

Harris added that this would more than likely be the case and the district should not have waited until the 11th hour to announce the closures.

The decision to relocate 81 virtual schools comes after a push by the Philadelphia Teachers’ Federation, citing a spike in COVID cases among teachers.

“As we’ve always said, our goal is to keep the district open so that we can surround our young people with the caring educators and support services they need – as long as we can do it safely,” said Superintendent William Hite, Jr. “District leaders met regularly with local public health officials to monitor the COVID-19 situation, and we also closely monitored the data to determine the impact of COVID on coverage. staff in schools. We will continue to do so and make school-by-school decisions based on the latest available data. “

The school district said principals will communicate directly with students and families with information regarding virtual learning. Staff at 81 schools are required to report to work in person unless they are isolated or quarantined due to exposure or testing, awaiting test results, showing symptoms or having approved leave.

Staff members who are able to provide virtual home schooling may do so after confirming arrangements with principals.

In addition, the school district says it continues to follow the guidelines of the Philadelphia Department of Health’s health and safety protocols, including:

  • Wearing a mask is compulsory for students and staff regardless of vaccination status;
  • Vaccine requirements for staff and student-athletes;
  • Weekly COVID-19 tests for employees and on-site COVID-19 tests for students who exhibit COVID-like symptoms during the school day;
  • Improved cleaning protocols during the school day and for several hours after the end of the school day at each school using cleaning products approved by the EPA;
  • Air and surface purifiers in all teaching spaces, gymnasiums, cafeterias and offices;
  • Maintain non-contact hand sanitizer stations and school supplies to support frequent hand washing and sanitizing by students and staff

Click here to view the list of the 81 schools that are moving virtually from Tuesday January 4 to Friday January 7 at least.

NO MORE NEWS: Chopper 3 video shows majority of Ocean County house ablaze

CBS3 reporters Alecia Reid and Wakisha Bailey contributed to this story.



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The Fiji Times »From the Editor’s Office: Your January 3 Briefing https://woodrosealumnae.org/the-fiji-times-from-the-editors-office-your-january-3-briefing/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 17:06:54 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/the-fiji-times-from-the-editors-office-your-january-3-briefing/ Bula allHope you all enjoy your break and wish you the best… be well and stay safe. SECURITIESHere are some of the headlines that made the Fiji Times’ Monday, January 3 edition. PAGE 1THE Ministry of Health and Medical Services is supporting the reopening of schools this week. Ministry of Health Permanent Secretary Dr James […]]]>

Bula all
Hope you all enjoy your break and wish you the best… be well and stay safe.

SECURITIES
Here are some of the headlines that made the Fiji Times’ Monday, January 3 edition.

PAGE 1
THE Ministry of Health and Medical Services is supporting the reopening of schools this week. Ministry of Health Permanent Secretary Dr James Fong made the comment as Fiji registers 805 new cases with two deaths from COVID-19. He said they had consulted the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF, looked at all the evidence and considered the current situation in Fiji. Dr Fong said the ministry’s plan to mitigate this third wave of COVID-19 and the potential health impact of any adverse weather conditions was sufficient.

PAGES 2 and 3
-FIJI has registered 805 new cases with two deaths from COVID-19. Dr Fong said 316 new cases were registered on Thursday, 223 new cases were registered on Friday and 266 new cases were registered in the past 24 hours ending at 8 a.m. yesterday morning.
– THE MAJORITY of people who tested positive in medical facilities had presented for medical conditions unrelated to COVID and tested positive during routine screening, Dr Fong said.
-The Ministry of Health and Medical Services is aware that a large part of its staff are tired and in need of rest and recovery.
– Dr Fong says he is convinced that the ministry’s plan to mitigate this third wave of COVID-19 and the potential health impact of any adverse weather condition is sufficient.
– THE Department of Health and Medical Services supports the reopening of schools this week. Dr Fong said they had consulted the World Health Organization and UNICEF, looked at all the evidence and considered the current situation in Fiji.

PAGE 4
– FIDJI should expect more rain over the next few months. This is after Fiji’s meteorological service released the January-March rainfall forecast report which predicted above-normal rains in most parts of the country.
– THE Ministry of Education is currently recruiting teachers to fill vacancies after 493 teachers left the ministry for a number of reasons, including resignation, retirement, death and dismissal.

PAGE 5
– Work on the $ 4.8 million Velovelo bridge in Lautoka is expected to be completed by March of this year. Kamal Prasad, CEO of the Fiji Roads Authority (FRA), said that although the work continued, inclement weather conditions had been a major factor in the construction works.
– The Fiji Taxi Association (FTA) urges Fijians not to attack operators who simply provide a service to the public. The call comes after a series of incidents of alleged assault on taxi drivers in the West Division. FTA Chairman Raben Bhan Singh said the spate of alleged assaults on taxi drivers was concerning.
– While many Fijians spent January 1 celebrating the New Year, some parents spent the day getting their kids ready for back to school. Waiyavi resident Dominic Lakshman Kumar said that while he wanted to celebrate the New Year, he was more concerned with buying stationery for his high school son.
PAGE 7
– UMENI Siovini says that amid the rising cost of basic food items and the cost of living, she is not sure if her two granddaughters will be able to go to school this week.
– REPAIR shoes outside the Suva Municipal Market, this is how Ashok Kumar puts food on the table for his wife and children. He said his income was barely enough to cover their daily expenses, let alone the educational needs of his children.
– THE FOUNDATION for the Education of Children in Need (FENC) in Fiji assisted more than 6,800 children with school supplies in 2021.

SPORTS
The bulk of the last page concerns rugby sevens, the ruling Fijian rugby federation and new national coach Ben Gollings.


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Officer whose bullet killed 14-year-old girl wanted to ‘change’ police https://woodrosealumnae.org/officer-whose-bullet-killed-14-year-old-girl-wanted-to-change-police/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 00:45:00 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/officer-whose-bullet-killed-14-year-old-girl-wanted-to-change-police/ “I am the LAPD. I have the power and the determination to influence CHANGE in the community, ”he wrote. In 2019, he spoke to a local news station about his approach to law enforcement. “There is no better crime reduction strategy than to engage with our young people, so that they are not afraid of […]]]>

“I am the LAPD. I have the power and the determination to influence CHANGE in the community, ”he wrote.

In 2019, he spoke to a local news station about his approach to law enforcement.

“There is no better crime reduction strategy than to engage with our young people, so that they are not afraid of us, to let them know that there are people out there who are care, ”Mr. Jones said.

In a profile of Mr Jones on the website for the University of Louisville, where he attended college after growing up in Kentucky, Mr Jones said he had a modest education. His mother, Toya J. Brazley, held several jobs to help raise her three sons. His father, the oldest William D. Jones, worked in insurance.

In 2006, Mr. Jones dropped out of school and moved to Los Angeles, a city eight times the size of his hometown. Initially, according to the profile, he had hoped to break into the entertainment industry. But he discovered a new vocation in 2009, when he joined the Los Angeles police. He loved her, as his lawyer said, because of his strong desire to help others.

Mr Jones eventually married, had a son, and in 2015 bought a house in Santa Clarita, a foothill town north of Los Angeles where middle-class families often go to find a slice of the suburbs. .

In 2020, Mr. Jones got the credits he needed for his communications degree from Louisville. That same year, he and his wife started their nonprofit, Officers for Change, which distributed donated backpacks and school supplies to fellow police officers, according to the police union.

Mr Jones has also started a home business called Use of Force Fitness, according to public records.

He has found time to serve as an assistant football coach for the Valencia High School Vikings, joining the program in the past two years as a wide receiver coach. The team celebrated winning a major regional title in November.


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Meet Mari Copeny: NowThis Next 2021 Honoree https://woodrosealumnae.org/meet-mari-copeny-nowthis-next-2021-honoree/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 13:41:03 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/meet-mari-copeny-nowthis-next-2021-honoree/ Throughout history, there have always been pioneers and creatives from every generation who have led the world to the brink of historical change through grassroots organization, self-expression, reclamation And much more. Young people have always been the leaders of our movements for change, and here at NowThis we are giving megaphones to change makers around […]]]>

Throughout history, there have always been pioneers and creatives from every generation who have led the world to the brink of historical change through grassroots organization, self-expression, reclamation And much more. Young people have always been the leaders of our movements for change, and here at NowThis we are giving megaphones to change makers around the world.

This year’s NowThis special is dedicated to those who have touched the world by making a difference in their communities, Mari Copeny aka Little Miss Flint is part of the 2021 class.

Mari Copeny was only eight years old when she made headlines for her activism and organizational efforts to end the Flint Water crisis. Now 14 years old, the bright young spirit continues to fight and defend the future of sustainable development rights.

It all started in 2016 when Mari wrote a heartfelt letter to former President Barack Obama. It was in this post that drew the country’s attention to the Flint Water crisis.

Now, in 2021, Mari has continued the fight by handing out over a million water bottles in the fight for clean water and raising over $ 500,000 for his Flint Kids projects, which provide children with supplies. school, Christmas toys, Easter baskets and film screenings.

As a youth ambassador for the Washington Women’s March and the National Climate March, Mari continues to be a strong advocate for environmental racism as she puts it: “Our greatest threat right now is that leaders do not take action against environmental racism and the US water crisis. . Sustainability is the ability to be able to maintain our environment for future generations. One thing we can stop doing now is to stop ignoring young people and ignoring the fact that the choices they make today are going to affect the future of my generation.


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Rup Timsina is a bridge between New American Families and Concord Schools https://woodrosealumnae.org/rup-timsina-is-a-bridge-between-new-american-families-and-concord-schools/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 19:57:05 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/rup-timsina-is-a-bridge-between-new-american-families-and-concord-schools/ When the COVID-19 pandemic hit New Hampshire in March 2020, Rup Timsina quickly realized that the transition to distance learning would not be smooth for many new American students and their families. Timsina, the district’s bicultural liaison – also known as the family literacy facilitator – knew that a combination of quarantine isolation, language barriers, […]]]>

When the COVID-19 pandemic hit New Hampshire in March 2020, Rup Timsina quickly realized that the transition to distance learning would not be smooth for many new American students and their families.

Timsina, the district’s bicultural liaison – also known as the family literacy facilitator – knew that a combination of quarantine isolation, language barriers, and lack of access to technical support meant that many students failed to connect. with their teachers and access their online courses.

Timsina and Concord High social worker Anna-Marie DiPasquale rallied together, creating a makeshift desk in the trunk of DiPasquale’s car with a laptop, wireless internet access point, bags of school supplies and snacks. They drove to the homes and apartment complexes where students lived and took families out, where they helped them access online courses, fill out paperwork, and solve technology problems.

“I used to go knocking on the door, sometimes knocking on the windows because on a lot of apartment doors the doorbell didn’t work,” Timsina said. “Call someone – even if it wasn’t the right house – ‘Can you go knock on someone’s door? »Take the family or students out and show them how to connect to schools.

When they realized that many students were having trouble waking up in time to attend their online classes, Timsina and DiPasquale got a doorbell and rang it loudly outside the students’ houses every morning to get them out of the room. their bed.

“In the name of help, we have disturbed so many people,” Timsina recalls, laughing.

DiPasquale, who named Timsina as his hometown hero, said his dedication to the families of Concord was clear during these difficult days at the start of the pandemic.

“Everyone went remotely except Rup,” DiPasquale said. “When everyone was fleeing the pandemic, Rup was running towards it.”

In her bicultural liaison role, Timsina is responsible for educating new American parents and students about the New Hampshire school system, making them feel welcome in schools, and providing support for things like enrollment. , filling in forms and communicating with teachers.

“Most of our parents have never seen school and never had the chance to go to school. They don’t know the importance sometimes, ”Timsina said. “It’s not easy for them to communicate directly with the school. It is not easy for them to fill out the forms or register. So there is a need for someone to educate with all of these things.

Much of Timsina’s motivation for helping students access their education comes from her own experiences. Timsina grew up in a remote village in Bhutan, where he had to walk for up to three hours through the forest to school each morning, and three hours home at the end of the day. He was the only child in his village to attend school because for most families agricultural work was a higher priority than education.

“I tell my stories to the children here: what is education and why do we need education? Said Timsina. “I went through difficulties in acquiring my education, and because of this I am in this position at the moment, I am able to help others.

As an adult, Timsina became a teacher in Bhutan and continued to work even after he and his family had to flee the country due to ethnic cleansing and were transferred to a refugee camp in Nepal. For nearly two decades, Timsina lived in the camp, helping to establish a school for the approximately 40,000 children who lived there. He recruited and trained teachers, designed an elementary math curriculum, and served as a liaison between the school and organizations like the United Nations Refugee Agency.

Timsina was relocated to Concord in 2008 where he still lives with his family. He started working for the Concord School District in 2012 through Lutheran Social Services (now Ascentria Care Alliance), and has been an official district employee since 2016.

Here at Concord, there is a great demand for Timsina’s attention. His working hours are not always regular, as families call on him for help at all hours of the day and night. Many families call Timsina to report the absence of a student instead of the main office. Her help is not limited to educational activities either – Timsina has intervened in families’ homes in the middle of the night in case of illness and even to defuse conflicts of domestic violence.

“He manages to find joy in everything. He exudes goodness and he exudes peace, ”said DiPasquale. “He really sets an example. You watch him live his life and you just think “this is a good way to experience life”. ”

Hajir Eissa, a The first grade at Concord High School said she knew Timsina before she came to school because he helped her family. She said she enjoyed working with him at school because he encouraged students from different backgrounds, who speak different languages, to work together and have fun.

“He’s just fun,” Eissa said. “Last week we played a game and we talked about how we should all be together with different cultures. He wants everyone to be included.

A big project that Timsina undertook this year was to organize a COVID-19 vaccination clinic for new American families, which was held at the Broken Ground School last spring. Timsina worked tirelessly until the February holidays, calling hundreds of refugee families in Concord through the Language Line interpretation service, telling them about the vaccination clinic and encouraging them to attend. The clinic ended up being full, with 350 participants.

As for Timsina, he will tell whoever wants to hear how much he loves his job.

“It’s the best. I dedicate my life to education,” Timsina said. “And I believe education is the only tool that gives people freedom and opportunity.”


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‘Friends’ support local school – The Roanoke-Chowan News-Herald https://woodrosealumnae.org/friends-support-local-school-the-roanoke-chowan-news-herald/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 21:08:11 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/friends-support-local-school-the-roanoke-chowan-news-herald/ JACKSON – Thanks to local efforts, a recent “Buddy Drive” benefited teachers and students at Central Elementary School in Jackson. Attendees were able to purchase and donate a Scentsy Buddy which was then distributed to students, and the commissions the vendors made from the purchase were also donated to the school to help teachers buy […]]]>

JACKSON – Thanks to local efforts, a recent “Buddy Drive” benefited teachers and students at Central Elementary School in Jackson.

Attendees were able to purchase and donate a Scentsy Buddy which was then distributed to students, and the commissions the vendors made from the purchase were also donated to the school to help teachers buy more. school supplies and other necessities.

Rich Square Scentsy Consultant Katie Lassiter has been hosting the event for the past five years, but this time, she’s decided to bring her support a little closer to home.

“Scentsy is a fragrance company, and a Scentsy Buddy is like a stuffed animal,” she explained.

The plush toys come with a pocket on the back where different scents can be inserted. Lassiter said that through the efforts of his group “Redeemed Blessings”, they were able to deliver a total of nearly 200 buddies to school on Dec. 15 with a check for $ 3,000.

“It went really well in a very short period of time,” Lassiter said, noting that they usually have a few months for the trip with friends, but only had three weeks for it this year because they had initially need approval to donate to school. .

“It was a group effort,” she added, gratefully acknowledging everyone who contributed.

In the past, Lassiter’s group has donated Scentsy Buddies to Greenville Children’s Hospital, but last year she said they’ve racked up enough donations over the past few years for them to donate. still remain.

“So this year, I really wanted to do something closer to home in our community, and I know these teachers have been struggling with COVID and the lack of fundraising for the past two years,” said she explained.

Lassiter, his family and other volunteers dropped off the donations at Central Elementary on December 15th. Even her five-year-old son, Aiden, helped bring and stack the buddy boxes. The students were already gone for the day when they made the deposit, but she said it was nice to see the positive reaction from the teachers when they arrived.

“It’s a really great feeling,” she said of the success of the event.

Some of Lassiter’s clients have children who attend Central Elementary School and they were especially excited to see the results of the fundraiser.

“You never know what someone is going through,” Lassiter continued, speaking of the importance of helping out in the community.

Lassiter said people can contact her at 252-676-1986 if they are interested in learning more and participating in future fundraisers.


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Flagler Schools first semester ends with music, fun and community https://woodrosealumnae.org/flagler-schools-first-semester-ends-with-music-fun-and-community/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 14:38:53 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/flagler-schools-first-semester-ends-with-music-fun-and-community/ Flagler Schools is now in our winter break and we hope everyone has a safe and happy vacation. Students return to class and to the start of the second semester on Wednesday January 5th. Here is a brief overview of the activities that took place on some of our campuses at the end of the […]]]>

Flagler Schools is now in our winter break and we hope everyone has a safe and happy vacation. Students return to class and to the start of the second semester on Wednesday January 5th. Here is a brief overview of the activities that took place on some of our campuses at the end of the first semester.

Bunnell Primary School

The BES Cheer Pups performed at the Central Park Starlight Festival in Palm Coast City and received the award for Best Walking Unit. The students worked hard on their routine which helped them perform the best ever! Bullpup Cheer trains every week after school with Ms. Koegler and Ms. Ricks.

Buddy Taylor College

Our first dance of the year was a success! Over 900 students qualified to participate by completing the term without any referrals. Students were able to use their PBIS (Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports) points to purchase their tickets to the dance. The winter wonderland themed dance had a local DJ, games outside, and a ton of fun!


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Arvilla Hanson (1931 – 2021) Obituary – Denver, CO https://woodrosealumnae.org/arvilla-hanson-1931-2021-obituary-denver-co/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 01:13:57 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/arvilla-hanson-1931-2021-obituary-denver-co/ ObituariesArvilla Hanson passed this life peacefully on December 14, 2021; she is predeceased by her beloved sixty-seven-year-old husband, Theodore (Ted) Hanson. Arvilla was born in Concordia, Kansas, in February 1931; she was the first child and eldest daughter of Vach and Laura Huber.In life, Arvilla was a remarkable woman with an extraordinary mind, a keen […]]]>

Obituaries
Arvilla Hanson passed this life peacefully on December 14, 2021; she is predeceased by her beloved sixty-seven-year-old husband, Theodore (Ted) Hanson. Arvilla was born in Concordia, Kansas, in February 1931; she was the first child and eldest daughter of Vach and Laura Huber.
In life, Arvilla was a remarkable woman with an extraordinary mind, a keen sense of purpose, a woman of great determination, and both well read and well educated. She lived a life of service and in the imperative of defending those in need. Arvilla’s life has served as an inspiration to so many in her roles as a woman, an educator, a champion for children and the importance of lifelong education. The family would like to take this time to honor a full life, a life equally well lived and well lived, and the extraordinary daughter, mother, aunt, friend, student, teacher and community leader that she has been throughout. of his life of almost 91 years. .
Arvilla began her own education at the Octagon School in Ames, Kansas. As the school needed an additional student to open initially and his father, Vach Huber, was a member of the school board, he enrolled the then four-year-old Arvilla in first grade where his love of education and teaching has started. Even at Arvilla’s tender age, she was a very capable student who quickly completed her daily studies; Noticing her love of learning, the teacher encouraged her to help other students, some older ones.
Arvilla’s education took place at a time when she rode to school on horseback until her younger sister, Vera, came of age a few years later; Around this time, their father Vach was designing, crafting, and crafting a cart that their horse, Doc, couldn’t disturb in the horses’ desire to take quick turns and come home after school. Arvilla had to learn how to unhook the horse from the cart, tie up the horse and hang the horse back on the cart to get home. When Arvilla began his first teaching assignment, a student asked him to go out and meet his horse; it was Doc. Hearing Arvilla’s voice, Doc caught her ears knowing who she was and expressed his joy at seeing her. Such a beautiful loop for Arvilla who heard from this student again on the occasion of her 85th birthday reminding her of that day.
The students studied in the sunlight through open curtains because there was no electricity. The teachers arrived well before school hours to start the stove for heating to ensure a comfortable learning environment as there was no central heating / air. Teachers taught multi-age groups from elementary to high school, all in the same room, who attended school every day of the school year, even in bad weather. There were no snow days, no snow plows, no public school buses and the students were looking forward to the day of school and learning.
Arvilla attended Concordia High School where she met her future husband, Ted Hanson, in 1944; he was 14, she 13. After graduation and determined to continue her education, Arvilla attended Emporia State College where she obtained her teaching certificate and Ted went to State University from Kansas. By the summer of 1949, she had accepted her first full-time position. As the first teacher before her, Arvilla would embark with a couple who chaired the school board of a nearby community and walk a mile and a half to school daily, arriving early in the morning to heat the school for the children. and prepare the building for learning.
The following year, with a year of teaching behind her, Arvilla returned to Concordia and accepted a position as a multigrade teacher at the “Red School House”. Arvilla was eighteen, some of his students were fifteen. Students at Arvilla have written to her over the years about how she was instrumental in their love of education and their self-confidence, proud of their fulfilled life. On her way home for Fall Fest, her children were able to meet some of her teachers but also meet some of her students where she was approached to ask if she still remembered them. She always has and asked about their lives today.
Ted and Arvilla were married at First Presbyterian Church on May 25, 1952; Shortly after their marriage, Ted was called up to active duty at Sampson Air Force Base in Geneva, New York, during the Korean Conflict. Basically, Arvilla continued to educate children until the birth of her first daughter. After completing the service engagement, the couple returned home to Concordia with their new daughter and welcomed their oldest son who was born at Concordia. With Ted accepting a job with Boeing, the young family moved to Wichita where Arvilla continued to teach while returning to college through correspondence programs, determined to earn her BA in education. Even with full-time education, two young children and another child on the way, Arvilla completed her education. Eventually, at almost 50 years old, Arvilla continued with her education, completing some 66 master’s hours in courses she was interested in.
After accepting a position with Martin Marietta, the family moved to Colorado where the Arvillas raised six children in the Columbine area. Arvilla and her husband were leading members of the community, serving for more than 50 years, with Arvilla teaching in newly opened schools and Ted and two of his close friends launching sports leagues for young athletes in the area under the name of the Columbine Sports Association. This LLC was transferred to the Jeffco Sports Association in 1993 when Ted retired. Committed to the importance of community and education, Arvilla firmly believed that a good education was the critical first step towards preparing young children for the world they faced, a fundamental requirement for a prosperous nation.
Arvilla has always believed that every child has the ability to learn, and teachers need only find the vehicle through which the student receives information most effectively, that “every child deserves a champion – an adult who doesn’t. will never abandon them. , who understands the power of connection and insists they become the best they can be. “~ Rita Pierson. Arvilla has always been this champion, this advocate, this warrior for children.
After his retirement, Arvilla once again focused on building a better community and working to meet the needs of others. Rather than retire, Arvilla became one of the two founding members of the Southwest Regional Women’s Group, a women’s organization focused on community work on behalf of women and family issues in the areas of health and welfare. education. Each year, the organization helps families by donating backpacks filled with specific school supplies to elementary schools in the area, undertakes food drives to restock the pantry at the Jefferson County Action Center, and hosts a celebration. annual which empowers women and their uniqueness.
Arvilla has touched so many lives with her work and dedication to others. We honor the wife, wife, daughter, mother, aunt, friend, mentor and educator that she has been throughout her life. Arvilla has been an inspiration to young and old alike about what can be accomplished if you commit to making a difference. Her incredible spirit, dedication to family, fierce dedication, steadfast nature, beloved advocacy and fearless determination will be missed. Good luck, my dear mother. Our father is waiting for you.
Arvilla’s Life to be Celebrated: Monday, December 27, 2021, 11:15 a.m., Fort Logan National Cemetery, 3698 South Sheridan Boulevard, Denver, CO 80236, Staging Area C:
In lieu of flowers, please consider a memorial donation on behalf of Arvilla Hanson to the Denver Hospice, the region’s premier, largest and most trusted provider of hospice and palliative care, offering more expertise, more resources and a more comprehensive continuum of compassionate care for patients facing life-limiting illnesses and end-of-life transition: https://thedenverhospice.org/giving/give-donate/
All commemorative gifts will be recognized with a card to the person you designate and will remain local. Please let us know who you want to remember, as well as the name and address of the person we need to notify about your gift.

Posted by Horan & McConaty – South Denver on Dec 18, 2021.


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Rita Williams obituary (2021) – Roanoke, Virginia https://woodrosealumnae.org/rita-williams-obituary-2021-roanoke-virginia/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 09:13:10 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/rita-williams-obituary-2021-roanoke-virginia/ Rita walters williams Rita Walters Williams was transported to heaven in the arms of angels on July 13, 2021. She’s surely enjoying a big Christmas party and if she wants Jesus will feast on homemade apple cake and boiled pastry cream. Hopefully God will get her to sit down after days of baking and wrapping […]]]>
Rita walters williams

Rita Walters Williams was transported to heaven in the arms of angels on July 13, 2021. She’s surely enjoying a big Christmas party and if she wants Jesus will feast on homemade apple cake and boiled pastry cream. Hopefully God will get her to sit down after days of baking and wrapping – something we have never been able to accomplish.

Her eyes must sparkle as she celebrates with her loved ones who have traveled before her. She’s probably sitting with her parents, Laura and Earnest Walters, and the precious Iva and Jack LaPrad. Her sister-in-law, Edith Hobbs, may be pushing her to eat more, while her brother, Garland Walters, shows off carpentry creations. Her hard-working brother-in-law, Woody, probably asks for a few seconds while Nikki licks the crumbs. Her grandparents, Bessie and Marcus Hill can be a source of heated conversation as her uncles exclaim, “Oh, mother”! Her husband, Robert Williams, lights the table with his pure, sweet smile, while her first husband, Richard Viar, plays with the drummer boys. His friends at GE and ITT recall strike lines and subjects beyond our comprehension, but they are more united than friends now. They are brothers and sisters in a paradise beyond our comprehension.

Rita was called home after a valiant battle with pancreatic cancer. She came out victorious because she didn’t let cancer take away the things most precious to her. The disease brought new depth to her social interactions, her flowers were brighter, and sunny days were never wasted. As she neared the finish line, the expectation of meeting her Lord face to face brought energy to her soul.

The struggles were nothing new to Rita. In 1966, amid limited opportunities, she bought a jazzy Chevy Nova and began a 30-year career with ITT and GE. She was determined that children; Kathy (Scott) Shrewsbury, Rick (Tina) Viar and Teresa (Chris) Sowers; would have a life of opportunity, security and love. She blew those goals out of the water every morning with a hot breakfast on a beautifully set table, and every night it was the same. The best part was still her magic iced tea and sitting around the table together. After her children left the nest, she and Bob joined the crowd at K&W, where they enjoyed seeing friends and avoiding dirty dishes. She had washed it all a life.

Rita appreciated beauty, even as a young girl dressing and sneaking to a gorgeous wedding at Fort Lewis Baptist Church. As an adult, she loved Sundays at Airlee Court Baptist Church and prepared impeccable outfits the night before. During worship, his concentration was sometimes interrupted by small hands slapping each other on the back, but “the gaze” took care of that, and everyone was rewarded with a tasty dinner of roast beef. Thanks to her dedication, the lives of her children were forever changed on these pews.

The school years began with a massive box of 15 Sears Roebuck outfits. Afterwards, the children saw Mr. Young at Hofheimers for new shoes and school supplies were purchased at Woolco. That first morning, she must have felt very accomplished. She was. Rita was savvy with a dollar and knew the importance of saving and investing; However, she never refrained from spoiling her grandchildren with clothes, toys, lessons, cars, jewelry and other “necessary” things for all grandchildren, including Teresa (Ted ) Cuddy, Jeremy Viar, Mary (David) Lugar, Nathan Viar, Barret Sowers (Ginni Baker) and Kathlyn Sowers (Christopher Allen). Each generation has grown up with Justin Lugar, Landon Wheeler, Declan and Larkin Viar.

Rita was fortunate to have a bonus family, which she both admired and loved. She cherished the dancing eyes of Randy (Bobbie) Williams and the sweet soul of Jeff Williams. Grandchildren, Crystal Williams and Jamie (Jameson) Gurley, along with Matt (TJ), Clay (Linda) and Brittany Williams brought pure joy. The precious great-great ones included Ryan, Zac and Nic Chittum; Canaan and Carter Williams; Lexie Marie Williams; Nevaeh and Jaxson; and the adorable “Gurley Guys”. Marie Oracko held a special place in Rita’s heart.

Rita liked to play in the dirt and talk about trees, flowers and vegetables. She abhorred pesticides and preferred to have a dandelion garden rather than endanger wildlife. She was a modern day Snow White, feeding the neighborhood animals, and was known to let the neighborhood cat in on cold days. The month before his departure, groups of cardinals were appropriately standing guard in the trees outside his sunny window.

Rita could prepare everything on her sewing machine and even make beautiful dresses by hand. She often burned midnight oil with special projects. Most recently, she burned the midnight oil on her computer. She was tech-savvy, becoming the family researcher and leaving detailed notebooks filled with instructions on how to do everything better! She possessed a wisdom that went far beyond books.

Although Rita’s illness limited visits, she remembered it daily. She longed to visit her sister-in-law, Opal Walters, and her nephews, Mark Walters and Jack Hobbs; as well as cherished aunts, Alma Hill and Sylvia Lemon. Her best friend, Bonnie Nicholson, was always the source of endless laughter.

She loved her many cousins ​​and friends very much. One of those friends is Karla Bower, who has faithfully encouraged Rita throughout her journey. Even though she sometimes knew the hardships, Rita looked a lot like a lucky redhead. As proof, the best neighbors and friends on the whole planet, Gene and Tracy Brady, lived right next to her.

Although she yearned to visit many faces, Rita understood the power of God’s call, knowing that she would see them in “an even better place.” Before being taken away, Rita made two requests – first, she said she couldn’t wait to see everyone, but please take our time to arrive. Second, “be happy, happy, happy”! Life is good and it is not over yet.

Rita’s family would like to especially thank Dr. Christine Mellon and the staff of the 10th Floor Palliative Care Unit of the Carilion Roanoke Memorial, who provided comfort and dignity beyond words. The gratitude of the family is forever over. Thanks for seeing that Rita never walked alone.

Posted by Roanoke Times on December 19, 2021.


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