School activities – Woodrose Alumnae http://woodrosealumnae.org/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 02:02:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://woodrosealumnae.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-2021-08-02T214900.103.png School activities – Woodrose Alumnae http://woodrosealumnae.org/ 32 32 San Diego Unified to Require COVID-19 Vaccinations for Sports and Other Extracurricular Activities https://woodrosealumnae.org/san-diego-unified-to-require-covid-19-vaccinations-for-sports-and-other-extracurricular-activities/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 01:53:00 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/san-diego-unified-to-require-covid-19-vaccinations-for-sports-and-other-extracurricular-activities/ As COVID-19 cases increase in the county, the San Diego Unified School District plans to require mandatory vaccinations for all students participating in extracurricular activities, including sports. The change was announced in a memo sent this week by the district to its 16 high school athletic directors. He also said tests would be required for […]]]>

As COVID-19 cases increase in the county, the San Diego Unified School District plans to require mandatory vaccinations for all students participating in extracurricular activities, including sports.

The change was announced in a memo sent this week by the district to its 16 high school athletic directors. He also said tests would be required for student-athletes participating in indoor sports.

Last month, a judge overturned the district’s mandate to vaccinate students against COVID-19, saying it was in conflict with state law. The warrant would have required unvaccinated students aged 16 and over to learn remotely via independent study from January 24.

Scott Giusti, director of physical education, health and athletics for SDUSD, said on Tuesday that the district’s interpretation is that the ruling only applies to the school day, not to extracurricular activities such as athletics, cheering, orchestra and theater.

“We try to keep the winter activities going, trying to make sure our athletes / students have a great experience,” said Giusti. “We are trying to keep everyone safe.”

The district also said in the memo that closing all non-essential and off-season activities would be required.

Giusti said some people “have interpreted this to mean that we are shutting down winter sports. We are not closing athletics or any other extracurricular activity this winter. “

What SDUSD does is force off-season sports – football weightlifting, baseball and softball conditioning, group training or cheering for a competition in April – to take a break. three weeks.

“Coming out of the holidays, we expected a crescendo in cases of COVID-19,” Giusti said. “As soon as it is certain, these off-season activities can resume. We are not talking about an extended downtime.

“We wanted to be careful, but nothing has changed when it comes to seasonal sports. Sure, there are challenges at our school sites, but schools do a good job of keeping their students safe. “

Other school districts in the county – Grossmont, Sweetwater, Escondido, Oceanside – currently have a “business-as-usual” policy.

Donnie Carroll, director of the Grossmont Athletic Conference, said: “We haven’t made any changes. We have changed the basketball league schedule for Friday to allow Mt. Miguel a home doubles program. The construction of their gymnasium has been delayed. This gives them the opportunity to organize a double program.

El Camino High’s boys and girls basketball teams have reworked schedules due to COVID-19.

Several schools – San Marcos, Rancho Bernardo, Westview, Francis Parker, La Jolla Country Day and Mater Dei Catholic among them – have halted basketball activities during the holidays amid COVID-19 concerns.


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Exeter school board reinstates mask requirement https://woodrosealumnae.org/exeter-school-board-reinstates-mask-requirement/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 01:18:04 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/exeter-school-board-reinstates-mask-requirement/ The Exeter School Board voted 7-2 on Sunday to reinstate mask requirements for all students, staff and visitors to buildings in the district. The restriction takes effect Monday and is expected to continue until January 19. The board plans to revisit the matter at its Jan. 18 meeting. The board met on Sunday to discuss […]]]>

The Exeter School Board voted 7-2 on Sunday to reinstate mask requirements for all students, staff and visitors to buildings in the district.

The restriction takes effect Monday and is expected to continue until January 19. The board plans to revisit the matter at its Jan. 18 meeting.

The board met on Sunday to discuss its response to Berks County’s decision last week to reinstate a declaration of disaster emergency due to a dramatic increase in COVID-19 cases these last days. The intention was to decide on any policy changes before the return of staff and students after the Christmas vacation.

The district has been making masks optional since a court ruling overturned state Department of Health orders requiring masks in all schools in Pennsylvania.

Board member Jason Mell, who introduced the motion, said it is wise to exercise caution when the local health system is under significant pressure. He said it would be better to act right away rather than wait until cases start to increase and making the masks optional greatly compromises their effectiveness in reducing the transmission of the virus.

Board member Timothy Morgan said a temporary mask requirement will make schools less likely to return to virtual learning.

Board chair Ann Hearing and member Andrea Battler voted against the measure. The hearing said it would be better to leave the matter to each family. She argued that COVID is not going to go away and that it is time to start treating like other contagious diseases rather than taking extreme measures to prevent its transmission. Battler objected to not requiring masks in sports and other activities involving physical exertion, which she said was inconsistent and would significantly reduce the effectiveness of the policy.

The board also passed Morgan’s motion calling on people to take precautionary measures if a member of their household tests positive for COVID-19. The measure is based on guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He recommends a five to 10 day quarantine for unvaccinated people as well as for fully vaccinated people who received their last dose more than six months ago for Pfizer and Moderna vaccines or two months ago for Johnson & Johnson. . People who have received a vaccination booster or who have been vaccinated more recently are invited to wear a mask at school for 10 days.

Morgan acknowledged that the policy cannot be enforced because there is no reporting requirement for positive COVID tests at home, but argued that it would be helpful to provide families in the district with clarification of what the school system expects from those in this situation.

The motion was carried by a vote of 8 to 1, the hearing being opposed.


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Karnataka: Bagalkot school is closed for Christmas celebrations | Bangalore News https://woodrosealumnae.org/karnataka-bagalkot-school-is-closed-for-christmas-celebrations-bangalore-news/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 01:48:00 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/karnataka-bagalkot-school-is-closed-for-christmas-celebrations-bangalore-news/ BAGALKOT: The education department closed a private school in Ilkal in the Bagalkot district for allegedly hosting a Christmas party. On December 25, prayers were held at Saint-Paul Upper Primary School followed by Christmas celebrations. The program was cut short by right-wing activists who claimed the pastor, who led the prayers, was engaged in conversion […]]]>
BAGALKOT: The education department closed a private school in Ilkal in the Bagalkot district for allegedly hosting a Christmas party.
On December 25, prayers were held at Saint-Paul Upper Primary School followed by Christmas celebrations. The program was cut short by right-wing activists who claimed the pastor, who led the prayers, was engaged in conversion activities.
The Hungund Block Education Officer (BEO) has now authorized the school to reopen following requests from the administration.
On December 25, Pastor Umesh Nayak held a school prayer meeting, which some people attended. The school administration allowed her to organize the prayer although she usually rents the space for local events.
Jackson D Marck, a member of the school administration, told TOI: “It was for a Christmas celebration with no more than 30 people in attendance. There was no conversion activity.
The right-wing group had accused the pastor of having converted schoolchildren and their parents to Christianity.
BEO Mahesh Bellinavar said there was no evidence of conversion, but the organizers served meat. “I ordered the school to be closed to keep the peace following a rally by the right-wing group. Now I have asked them to resume school activities, ”he said.
When asked about the attendees, the BEO said the schoolchildren or their parents were not present at the meeting.
Pradeep Amarannanavar, head of a pro-Hindu group, had complained to Tahsildar K Rathna that the school was trying to convert people. “The principal invited the students and parents to school on Christmas Day and served them meat and wine, and also gave them a copy of ‘Satya Veda’ (Kannada translation of the Bible). It is nothing more than an attempt to convert Hindus to Christianity through seduction and force, ”he said.


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EW Committee Awards Grants To Local Entities Helping To Improve The Community | Newsletters https://woodrosealumnae.org/ew-committee-awards-grants-to-local-entities-helping-to-improve-the-community-newsletters/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 15:54:00 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/ew-committee-awards-grants-to-local-entities-helping-to-improve-the-community-newsletters/ WINDSOR EST – The East Windsor Greater Together Community Fund Advisory Committee awarded more than $ 27,000 in grants this month to six organizations that work to improve the community, including providing music therapy to students, providing opportunities for carpooling to residents and helping with repairs to a farm that gives riding lessons to children […]]]>

WINDSOR EST – The East Windsor Greater Together Community Fund Advisory Committee awarded more than $ 27,000 in grants this month to six organizations that work to improve the community, including providing music therapy to students, providing opportunities for carpooling to residents and helping with repairs to a farm that gives riding lessons to children with autism.

East Windsor is one of the cities to which the nonprofit Hartford Foundation for Public Giving has donated money through its Greater Together Community Fund, which helps residents meet the needs of their communities.

In East Windsor, the advisory committee awarded a grant of $ 7,000 to Abby’s Helping Hand to provide music therapy to special education students at Broad Brook Elementary School.

The non-profit organization, founded by Joe and Carol Sauerhoefer, whose 10-year-old daughter Abby was born with a mitochondrial disorder, is dedicated to improving the quality of life for people with mitochondrial diseases and other chronic diseases through support, education and research.

The city’s social services department received $ 5,600 to work with carpooling programs for residents who need transportation assistance to doctor’s and other necessary appointments.

The East Windsor Historical Society Museums on the Green received $ 7,000 to renovate a red metal barn to display large farm equipment and to showcase different aspects of agriculture and industry in the early years from the city.

The museums site on Scantic Road – which serves East Windsor and all surrounding towns – is one of the largest in the region with 35 acres and seven different buildings on its overflowing campus, wrote Membership Chair Nancy Masters in the grant application.

The museum site has been described as a mini village of Sturbridge, she said.

“We would like to group our agriculture related articles together so that we can tell the story of East Windsor’s rich agricultural history,” Masters said. “We are the only history museum in the city and we are fortunate to have so many items to display.”

The modernization of one of the red metal barns will create a permanent educational exhibit on all types of farming, Masters said in his application.

“We have been growing for over 50 years and intend to continue to grow,” she wrote. “Our tobacco rack is so full of items that it is almost impossible to walk around and see our items / displays.”

The city’s Housing Authority received a grant of $ 700 for a licensed nutritionist to provide residents with informal presentations on the benefits of eating healthy foods.

The East Windsor Diversity Council received $ 1,500 to launch a community forum to explore the implications of diversity and inclusion. The council said in its request that the pilot program aims to encourage civic engagement and participation to ensure all residents of East Windsor are represented.

Shag Bark Hickory Farm on Harrington Road received $ 5,250 to repair a fence used for the arena and pasture.

Rosemary Malin founded the farm 40 years ago as a haven for older and retired horses and to offer the love of riding to those who can’t afford lessons, her daughter said. Katie Malin-Hunt.

She said there were seven horses on the farm, although she often jokes that there are only 6 ½ because of their little pony.

“We are reaching out to children with autism and those who need more joy in their lives,” said Malin-Hunt of the lessons on the farm.

She said she and her mother were extremely grateful for the grant, as the fence used for horse riding areas and pastures had been in need of repair for many years, but they always chose to spend the money helping students. .

“It will definitely help a lot,” she said. “We organize a lot of community events, which will allow more activities for the young people of the region. “

The Greater Together Community Fund Advisory Committee was established by the Hartford Foundation for Giving to help East Windsor residents take charge of the city’s needs and encourage broad and inclusive civic engagement, said Robert Maynard, l ‘former city chief selectman who is president of communications. and marketing for the committee.

“We, the Advisory Board, would like to thank the Hartford Foundation for Public Giving for giving us the opportunity to meet some of the needs of the East Windsor community and to contribute to the quality of life for our residents,” said he declared.

Thirteen local organizations applied for a grant, and the eight-member advisory committee ranked them according to criteria such as how well the organizations would be able to implement the proposed projects, if the projects met a real need in the community, how many people the projects would be and if the projects are new and would not duplicate anything else going on in the city.

A big part of the mission of the East Windsor Greater Together Community Fund Advisory Committee is to ensure that grants have the greatest possible impact for residents, said Maynard.

“We hope these and future grants inspire others to engage in civic activities and come together to identify and meet the needs of the residents of East Windsor,” he said.

The advisory committee is always looking for new members, he said. If anyone has any ideas on the city’s needs or would like to join the committee, send an email to ewcommunityfund@gmail.com


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CDC Amends Quarantine Guidelines; record number of cases in the United States https://woodrosealumnae.org/cdc-amends-quarantine-guidelines-record-number-of-cases-in-the-united-states/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 21:22:30 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/cdc-amends-quarantine-guidelines-record-number-of-cases-in-the-united-states/ The flu season in the United States began this winter after taking time off last year: hospitalizations are increasing and two child deaths have been reported. The 2020-2021 influenza season – the first new season since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic – has been the lowest in decades. Some large cities have not seen […]]]>


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TOP STORIES OF 2021: West Virginia schools sought more normalcy this year | News, Sports, Jobs https://woodrosealumnae.org/top-stories-of-2021-west-virginia-schools-sought-more-normalcy-this-year-news-sports-jobs/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 05:09:36 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/top-stories-of-2021-west-virginia-schools-sought-more-normalcy-this-year-news-sports-jobs/ File photo by Scott McCloskey – Ohio County Board of Education chairman David Croft speaks at a board meeting last year as Superintendent Kim Miller looks on. The debate over wearing masks in schools has taken a long time at several meetings of the Ohio County Board of Education. WHEELING – Students in West Virginia […]]]>

File photo by Scott McCloskey – Ohio County Board of Education chairman David Croft speaks at a board meeting last year as Superintendent Kim Miller looks on. The debate over wearing masks in schools has taken a long time at several meetings of the Ohio County Board of Education.

WHEELING – Students in West Virginia and beyond learned all about the words ‘COVID-19’ and ‘pandemic’ while studying at home in 2020, but in 2021 educators wanted them to return to the classroom and learn the word “normality”.

The challenge for school administrators this year was to strike a balance between ensuring student safety and providing them with the best learning environment.

Students began returning to class after the start of 2021 after spending most of 2020 learning remotely at home due to COVID issues. The “re-entry” of local county students into traditional classrooms began in late January, and by the end of February, school districts had reverted to in-person instruction five days a week.

Educators realized from grades and test scores that many students fell behind in learning at home in 2020, which necessitated the need for more one-on-one instruction with students after they returned home. class.

Many school districts have plans to hire additional teachers to serve as advocates and work individually with at-risk children.

There was also a need for student enrichment activities, especially in the areas of math and science.

In February, Marshall County Schools’ career and technical education director Scott Varner told board members that it had been difficult to provide quality education in many technical programs and online professionals, when these are based on more practical teaching methods.

“It’s very difficult to teach when you don’t have students in person,” he said. “The difficulty with our career technology employees is that 95-98% of teaching is hands-on, on the shop floor or in their work areas. “

Schools in Marshall County scheduled their first CTE summer camp for the first week of June, and students attending the camp had 12 programs from which they could receive job training.

Welding courses have turned out to be the most popular. Other options included education in agriculture, automotive technology, broadcasting, commerce, culinary arts, drawing, engineering, firefighter / paramedic, carpentry, information technology, and therapeutic services. About 180 students participated.

At the end of June, schools in Ohio County held a robotics camp designed to spark students’ interest in science. One camp was open to students in Kindergarten to Grade 5, while the second focused on high school students in Grades 6 to 8.

The course week included classes on coding basics, robot programming, and technology challenges.

JoJo Shay, Innovation Coordinator for Ohio County Schools, acknowledged that such educational opportunities weren’t always available in the past.

“Everyone has been through a difficult time this year,” she said in May. “What we want students to learn is to code not only to read and write, but also to explore your creative side. “

School districts have also struggled with the issue of students and staff wearing masks in school buildings and on school buses. Local school districts have widely demanded masks since students returned to class.

Wearing masks became as common as reading, writing, and Chromebooks in Ohio County schools in 2021, but finding common ground on a mask policy has proven to be a challenge for students. members of the education council this year.

The most recent action by the board took place at its meeting last week. Ohio County schools now require students and staff to wear masks only when the county is designated orange or red on the state’s COVID-19 alert map.

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Qatar – Many activities at Rajagiri public school https://woodrosealumnae.org/qatar-many-activities-at-rajagiri-public-school/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 19:26:48 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/qatar-many-activities-at-rajagiri-public-school/ (MENAFN- Gulf Times) Rajagiri Public School (RPS) celebrated Qatar’s National Day with an array of activities. A special assembly was organized with the central theme “National Identity” reflecting the rich tradition and heritage of the country. The students presented the ethnic and traditional aspects of Qatari culture. The highlight was a cultural extravaganza featuring Arabic […]]]>

(MENAFN- Gulf Times)

Rajagiri Public School (RPS) celebrated Qatar’s National Day with an array of activities. A special assembly was organized with the central theme “National Identity” reflecting the rich tradition and heritage of the country. The students presented the ethnic and traditional aspects of Qatari culture.
The highlight was a cultural extravaganza featuring Arabic songs, a sword dance, a tribute to FIFA, a ramp and a video showcasing the developments made by Qatar in the fields of education. , culture and economy over the years.
The guest of honor, Mahmoud Alakhras, spoke on the occasion and thanked the students for putting on a spectacular show.
The program ended with a message from the school principal.
On the occasion, RPS also unfurled a 20x4m Qatar national flag with the printing of the students’ palms. The entire school premises were beautifully decorated in brown and white tones, balloons and national flags.

MENAFN241220210000067011011ID1103443899

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Starfish Initiative is looking for mentors to help Indy’s youth https://woodrosealumnae.org/starfish-initiative-is-looking-for-mentors-to-help-indys-youth/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 10:08:59 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/starfish-initiative-is-looking-for-mentors-to-help-indys-youth/ For Crystal Givens, life is about giving back to others. She learned it at a very young age, growing up in the church, and from her mother who has always been the caretaker of the community and a “surrogate” for many children in the neighborhood. “I didn’t realize how critical this was,” Givens said, “until […]]]>

For Crystal Givens, life is about giving back to others.

She learned it at a very young age, growing up in the church, and from her mother who has always been the caretaker of the community and a “surrogate” for many children in the neighborhood.

“I didn’t realize how critical this was,” Givens said, “until I was a lot older.”

She began her career as a teacher in early childhood education and eventually found her place in the nonprofit space, becoming vice president of statewide support for Early Learning. Indiana, the state’s oldest nonprofit early childhood education organization.

Givens said she was drawn to the opportunity there because she felt she could impact more students by helping teachers instead of teaching a single class herself.



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Football concludes Frisco Bowl activities https://woodrosealumnae.org/football-concludes-frisco-bowl-activities/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 23:53:24 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/football-concludes-frisco-bowl-activities/ History links Bowl Information Tickets Photo gallery Highlights from the press conference Quote FRISCO, Texas – The San Diego state soccer team had its final activities on Monday ahead of Tuesday night’s clash with No.24 UTSA in the 2021 Tropical Smoothie Cafe Frisco Bowl. Aztec Head Coach Brady hoke spoke to the media at a […]]]>

FRISCO, Texas – The San Diego state soccer team had its final activities on Monday ahead of Tuesday night’s clash with No.24 UTSA in the 2021 Tropical Smoothie Cafe Frisco Bowl.

Aztec Head Coach Brady hoke spoke to the media at a morning press conference at Toyota Stadium with senior linebacker Caden McDonald and senior running back Kaegun williams.

Early in the afternoon, SDSU paid a brief visit outside of its team’s headquarters at the OMNI Frisco Hotel, as temperatures struggled to break the 50-degree plateau under partly cloudy skies.

San Diego State (11-2), which tied a school record with 11 wins this season and finished 24th in the final college football playoff standings, will find themselves with No.24 (AP) UTSA (12-1 ) Tuesday, from 6:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. PT.

At the time of going to press, the game night forecast calls for clear skies and temperatures of 52 degrees with SSE winds at 5 miles per hour, according to Weather.com.

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Can testing children exposed to COVID-19 help them stay in school? New CDC report says yes https://woodrosealumnae.org/can-testing-children-exposed-to-covid-19-help-them-stay-in-school-new-cdc-report-says-yes/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 20:15:39 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/can-testing-children-exposed-to-covid-19-help-them-stay-in-school-new-cdc-report-says-yes/ Schools should consider frequently testing students who have been exposed to the COVID-19 virus and allowing them to stay in school, rather than sending them home to quarantine, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends. The recommendation is based in part on a pair of reports released Dec. 17 showing the strategy reduced infection […]]]>

Schools should consider frequently testing students who have been exposed to the COVID-19 virus and allowing them to stay in school, rather than sending them home to quarantine, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends.

The recommendation is based in part on a pair of reports released Dec. 17 showing the strategy reduced infection rates and children in school in Los Angeles County and Lake County, Ill., near Chicago.

“Test to stay” may be “another valuable tool” in school districts’ arsenal of COVID prevention, alongside immunizations, mask wear, drug tests, ventilation and physical distancing, the agency in a press release.

U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona, the Biden administration’s top education official, stressed the approach keeps children in classrooms, where most students learn best. .

“Our students’ social and emotional growth and academic development are best nurtured in person in their classrooms with their peers and teachers,” he said in a statement. “It is encouraging that the testing strategies for staying are proven to be effective both in limiting the transmission of the virus and in ensuring that students can continue to learn in school, so that classrooms or Entire schools do not have to close when a case of COVID-19 is discovered in the school community.

The test to stay, however, does not appear to be widespread, despite federal money available for such programs, and President Joe Biden encouraging schools consider the practice. In a nationally representative survey of school and district leaders by the EdWeek Research Center in early September, 52% said they did not require any COVID testing of students or staff, a figure that has not changed since April.

Testing to stay isn’t easy, especially for resource-strapped schools, one of the CDC’s reports acknowledged. The strategy places more demands on staff, requires rigorous contact tracing, and assumes that local schools or health care providers have access to a sufficient number of tests. Schools should also have sufficient space for physical distancing, especially during lunch. The CDC updated its recommendations on the test on Friday to stay.

Assessing the impact of the test to stay in California and Illinois

Before the start of the school year, Los Angeles County extended the test-to-stay option to 78 districts, and about 21% of schools decided to try it. (The county’s largest school district, Los Angeles Unified, agreed.)

Schools participating in the test to stay allowed children who had come in close contact with COVID-19 to continue attending school in person if they remained asymptomatic, wore a mask at school, got tested twice by week and agreed to quarantine himself at home when he is not at school. Students who had been exposed to the virus could not participate in extracurricular activities or daycare before or after school until the end of the quarantine period.

The result? COVID-19 cases have not increased in schools that have implemented the test to stay in late September and October of this year, according to the report. Meanwhile, elsewhere in the county, students who had been exposed to the virus and were forced to stay out of class lost a combined total of more than 92,000 days of in-person school.

Likewise, the Lake County report found that testing to stay resulted in “low secondary transmission” of the virus. Like Los Angeles County, Lake County allowed students who had come in contact with COVID-19 to stay in school if they wore masks, and was tested four specific days after exposure. Unlike Los Angeles County, students in Lake County could continue to participate in extracurricular activities at school.

Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, 1.6 million members, praised the results and encouraged schools to adopt the test to stay.

“The test-to-stay protocol is a promising strategy that can minimize quarantines and keep students safe in classrooms with their peers and teachers, where they do best,” she said in a statement.


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